Categories
berries conservation nature trail walking

Halifax Mainland Common: Early Fall, 2015

A friend and I regularly meet to chat over coffee and then usually finish up by walking the maintained trail in the Halifax Mainland Common Park, but today we decided to take a brief excursion onto the unmaintained trails criss-crossing the park. The last gasp of a faint summer and early signs of fall are evident everywhere.

Some mushrooms are dried and cracked in a mosaic pattern:

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Ferns and other brush are browning amongst the various greens of late summer:

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A few late blueberries still cling to isolated bushes here and there:

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The riot of fall colours in this small clearing, dotted with cotton-grass, burst into view as we round a corner, set behind by a backdrop of nearby buildings:

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The ferns here are vivid, like a slow burning fire that will take the rest of fall to burn out:

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We appreciate one last splash of colour before we head back under the cover of woods to rejoin the maintained trail:

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So many times we’ve travelled our usual route “on automatic”. I’m happy today we left the more travelled trail to share in these glimpses of the changing of seasons in a wilderness preserved for our enjoyment immediately at hand to a densely populated part of the city.

Categories
berries gallery hiking nature photography

Annual Bluff Hike, 2015

Here is a photo journal of our hike on the Bluff Wilderness Trail with my friend, Ryan Neily, as is our tradition at this time of year. Rather than hike all four loops, as we achieved last year, we chose to cover only the Pot Lake and Indian Hill loops. Like our meandering pace, our conversations were enjoyable and far ranging, with Nature doing her part, stimulating our minds and bodies and refreshing our spirits.

A break at the summit of Pot Lake loop. Click to start slideshow.
A break at the summit of Pot Lake loop. Click to start slideshow.
Northern bayberry A few showers quickly dissipated into light mist on the first leg of the hike Ryan, enjoying one of the many beautiful views Cormorant or shag. Hard to say from this poor, zoomed cellphone shot. Darkened pool amongst the rugged trees Late summer colours A riot of life shoots up in every crevice Large boulders and trees, forming a non-concrete alley along the trail margin Huckleberries still plentiful on the Indian Hill loop Sustenance to keep us going Not at all picked over, like the Pot Lake loop We break here for lunch Just about ready to embark on the last half We are surprised by the productivity of these short, scrubby huckleberries Barely rising from the reindeer moss, each huckleberry twig provides sweet, juicy handfuls A small pond on the trip back A break on the home stretch “Common” juniper, which nevertheless is not so common out here Immature green common juniper “berries” (actually cones)
Categories
flowers hiking kids nature photography trail

Hike at Blomidon Park: Late Summer, 2015

I had the wonderful privilege to go camping and hiking with my kids’ scouting group, the Pathfinders of Tantallon SDA church. The day started with a quick trip to Pugwash with one of the leaders to bring back some chairs to their school, and then we headed back out to Blomidon to meet up with the group. Click the photo below to start the slideshow.

The road trip started early to fetch some chairs
The road trip started early to fetch some chairs – click to start
The smudgy truck windows make an interesting filter Still an hour or more away from our first stop More funky filtering, this time with trees participating Wentworth valley – taken over the cluttered dash We disturbed a great blue heron’s breakfast at Wallace The beach at Pugwash SDA Camp where we loaded the chairs Trucking along past Truro After dropping off chairs, finally approaching Blomidon Getting very close to Blomidon Some bikers out to enjoy the views Interesting white berries Interesting red berries My first up close look at the point with my hiking buddy, Dave, on the first day An experimental panorama. Not sure I have the knack for keeping the horizon straight. We must bring the group out here tomorrow! Fast ringneck snake! Hard to get a clear shot Pre-dawn over the campground The first blush of coming dawn The Moon and Venus just before dawn Evergreens surrounding our camp site, pre-dawn Seems I’m still the only one up Half of the tents on the spacious group site Half of the tents on the spacious group site My daughter, the artist My two youngest and their best friend Some relaxing down time after breakfast Not sure who said what, but apparently they were hilarious. 🙂 The smoke was a bit much for my eldest Geoff entertaining the troops Dave making breakfast Dave making breakfast Breakfast just wrapping up Relaxing while we finish breakfast Looks like that needs some tweaking A bit too smoky The whole group The whole group Just goofing around Who’s winning? Enjoying the last embers of the breakfast fire before heading to Jodrey Trail I admire this young lady’s great eye for photography She has some sweet gear A lot of old hardwoods out here Dave did this hike with me yesterday – Excellent hiking buddy! Words can’t describe how much more stunning these views are in person All the cameras came out Got to get that perfect shot! A tree clinging to the eroding ground above the sheer cliff A lookoff on Jodrey Trail A lookoff on Jodrey Trail Lining up her shot /a> A lookoff on Jodrey Trail A lookoff on Jodrey Trail A lookoff on Jodrey Trail A fern with sharply serrated sturdy leaves I’m not familiar with Breaking camp at group site 404 One final chance to enjoy the view from the park entrance before heading home
Categories
berries conservation gallery hiking nature public event trail walking

McIntosh Run “Hike the Greenbelt” event, August 2015

Just came back from a wonderful time hiking with my daughter at the finale Hike the Greenbelt event at the Backlands/McIntosh Run! This photo slideshow is from my HP snapshot camera which unfortunately has dust in the lens. But I felt it was more important to get them up soon than to get them perfect, so please click the photo below to start the slideshow. I want to thank everyone who made this event a success, and not going to name specific names as I’m sure I’ll miss someone important. But thanks especially to Martin, the leader of our group.

Marcos Zentilli explaining geology of the region. Click photo to start slideshow.
Marcos Zentilli explaining geology of the region. Click photo to start slideshow.
Barrens Barrens Barrens Barrens DIGITAL CAMERA Jack Pine in Jack Pine 😉 DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA Part of the waterway DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA DIGITAL CAMERA
Categories
berries flowers gallery macro nature photography trail walking

BLT Bike Trail – Early Summer 2015

This is one of my regular walking routes, from home to Five Island Lake and back. It’s about 15 km. I usually walk too briskly to capture the many visual delights of this route. Today on the trip out, I stopped and took several photos to share with you.

An early morning walk up the BLT bike trail. Click to start the slideshow.
An early morning walk up the BLT bike trail to Five Island Lake (pictured here) and back. Click to start the slideshow.
The walk starts from our subdivision. It’s cool and clear when I leave.

Saskatoon berries Saskatoon berries Saskatoon berries Dew on leaves Dew on leaves Pitcher plants Something’s attacking this alder. Maybe woolly aphids?

Wild strawberries Wild strawberry Wild strawberry Wild strawberry Wild strawberries Daisy Daisy Vetch Vetch Water lily Water lily

Sensitive fern Squirrel! Cranberry Lake Cranberry Lake
Categories
gallery hiking nature trail

Bluff Trail – Early Summer 2015

Here’s a photo journal of a walk I just completed around the Pot Lake loop of the Bluff Wilderness Hiking Trail. Hope you enjoy it!

I was dissatisfied with my initial post, so have reduced the size to improve load time, changed the gallery software and have rewritten many of the captions.

My favourite stunted tamarack, clinging to the rocks.
Click this photo to start the slideshow.
The Bluff Wilderness Hiking Trail is a series of four loops. Today I’ll tackle only the first in order to get as many pictures as possible, and because when hiking solo, I prefer to stay on the more heavily traveled part. In late summer, I’ll probably do all four loops with my friend Ryan again. Meanwhile, I’ll stay in shape coming out here when I can for shorter walks. The trail starts here. Right away, even before heading between the marker stones, there’s a pretty view of Cranberry Lake off to the right. Pink lady slippers have been plentiful this year! All along the trail, you can find hundreds, if not thousands of these. Boardwalks provide dry passage across the boggy bits. The pitcher plants are thriving, too. The vines with tiny, round leaves are wintergreen. Tasty! I’ve not seen anything larger than a deer out here. Roots and rocks are a recurring theme. Many feet beating down on the first loop have packed the earth hard and have exposed more roots than you’ll see deeper into the trail system where fewer hikers travel. Step carefully. Sheep laurel is an eye-catcher. To me, they look like little, pink jewels. Yellow markers clearly mark the Pot Lake loop. At crucial junctures there are some signs to point you the right way. If you’re looking only at your feet, you may see black circles marked with arrows on some of the rocks, also pointing the way. The vegetation varies from scraggly and clinging to the rocks, to lush and green. The path is wet in parts. Nothing impassible, though. On the first loop in particular, and even within only the first kilometre, there are some pretty stunning views of the lake. Very quickly, you’ll find yourself perched up top on the rocks. On this stretch, you need to hop a bit from one rock to the next. Just as quickly as you ascended, you descend back down to the lake again. A good place to stop and have a snack. The start of the first loop, itself. I chide myself for not having discovered this trail until about 2007, even though we moved out here in 2005. It’s a treasure we’re indebted to the WRWEO for preserving. Leave some comments in the box, if you like. You’ll find these maps along the way to track your progress. Remember to follow proper trail etiquette. A particularly steep climb! Despite the best trail maintenance efforts, water still goes where it wants! Good to have boots. Another steep climb. This tree is chattering at me. Raising quite a racket. What’s in the hole? I patiently wait with my camera to get a good shot of the tree’s occupants. Mother woodpecker, feeding her babies! As the feeding continues, the chirping intensifies! Up on top of a big rock with a view over the lake is another favourite stopping place for a snack. The view at my snack break rock. I never get tired of it. There are some pretty big boulders. Next time I’ll bring a friend to stand under it for scale. Another terrific view. A stream just before the first portage. This portage connects Cranberry Lake with Pot Lake. The portage is clearly marked. The Pot Lake end of the portage. One of several upturned trees, with the roots now forming a wall along one side of the trail. The spiral of the roots mimics the spiral split in this boulder which you can walk all of the way into until you reach the centre. Rocks and trees and trees and rocks … White pine catkins. Suddenly the close forest opens up into a wide view all around. My favourite stunted tamarack, clinging to the rocks. Last year’s cones. This year’s aren’t out yet on this tree. I love the tamarack’s delicate new needles. These blueberries have a head start. Can’t wait until it’s time to harvest them. Nearly at the top of the Pot Lake loop. This is Pot Lake, itself. I was struck by this one little blighted berry, showing a blush of distress-induced colour amongst the green ones. Another view, nearly at the top. A sign beneath the map: Rare Plant Species: Mountain Sandwort – Arenaria groenlandica. Use caution and stay on designated trails. Avoid disturbing habitat. Finally, the top. A map to mark your progress. Probably three-toothed cinquefoil, right at the base of the faded sign. Whichever species it is, it’s a pretty, delicate little thing. After passing the sign, the view from the top over Cranberry Lake, indeed both lakes, is a reward worth climbing all of the way up to see. Some other hiker has left a cairn. The descent is not too steep at first. The approach down to the back side of Pot Lake from the top is marked by exposed bedrock and scrubby plants. Finally back to some cover, which is welcome on hotter days. A ferny fairyland. It’s not all abrupt ups and downs. Here’s an easy, winding stretch of trail. Cinnamon ferns. Ambling along. Rounding the end of Pot Lake. Not very long after reaching the lake, the path climbs several metres up above it. There are some nice, rootless bits on this side of the loop, giving your ankles and knees a break. This guy seemed extremely agitated to see me. A new tamarack cone! Did I mention I like tamaracks? The steep descent back to Cranberry Lake again. Finally back where the loop starts.
Categories
debian development forensics jessie live rescue stretch

Debian Live Rescue needs some love

You may have noticed that Jessie no longer includes the useful rescue flavour of live image, formerly included in Wheezy and earlier releases, and neither will Stretch unless you take action. This is my second public call for help this year to revive it. So if you care about rescue, here’s how you can help:

  • First, try a self-built image, based on the old live-image-rescue configuration. While Jessie still contains the live-image-rescue configuration for live-build as a starting point, to successfully build this image for yourself, you need to edit the package lists to drop or substitute any packages that aren’t in the archive. As of writing, this includes libphash0, mii-diag, denyhosts, hal and emacs23-nox. (Tip: for the latter, substitute emacs24-nox.)
  • Join or form a team to maintain the rescue metapackages in the long term. All of the official Debian Live images are based on metapackages that are looked after by various other teams, (principally the desktop teams,) with rescue being the sole exception. The old package lists include some forensics packages, so you may wish to contact Debian Forensics, but I don’t want to presume they’ll take it on.
  • Have your team decide on what a rescue system should include. You might start with the old lists, spruced up a bit just to make the image build, or you might take an entirely different tack. This is your project, so it’s up to you.
  • File a bug on tasksel, preferably with patch, to include a task-forensics and/or task-rescue task (or whatever you decide the task or tasks should be called).
  • File a bug on the live-images package to include your work.

If you have any questions not answered in this post, please feel free to leave a comment on this blog, talk to the Debian Live team on irc — I’m SynrG, and hang out with the team at #debian-live @ irc.oftc.net) — or drop us an email at debian-live@lists.debian.org.

Categories
debian development jessie jr packaging tuxpaint

Eleventh hour upload of tuxpaint

I have just made an eleventh hour upload of tuxpaint, tuxpaint-config and tuxpaint-stamps. With luck, this will make it in time for the Nov. 5 Jessie freeze deadline so it goes in as an unassisted migration. Coming soon to a mirror near you!

Categories
gallery hiking nature trail

Bluff Wilderness Trail Hike, Summer 2014

Happy to be back from our yearly hike with my friend, Ryan Neily, on the Bluff Wilderness Trail. We’re proud of our achievement, hiking all four loops. Including the trip to and from the head of the trail, that was 30 km in all. Exhausting, but well worth it.

On the trip we bumped into one of the people from WRWEO who helps to maintain the trail, and stopped for a bit to talk to swap stories and tips about hiking the trail. Kudos to Nanci for helping keep this trail beautiful and accessible. We really appreciate the tireless work of this organization, and the thought they’ve put into it. It’s a treasure!

Categories
bug CSS debian iceweasel wheezy

Invisible CSS animations on Iceweasel consuming CPU

Thanks to bernat on #debian @ irc.debian.org for helping me track down this bug and devise a workaround.

When working on my wife’s netbook, I noticed that when idling on Facebook in iceweasel 24.3.0esr-1, the process was taking far too much CPU. I then retested on a wheezy system with the release iceweasel from mozilla.d.n, which at that time was 26, and I later upgraded to 27. Same problem there, too, on both versions. In fact, it seems the slowdown was amplified by the fact that I was running iceweasel in vnc4server, not the worlds most efficient X implementation.

Even with all these versions tested, I have yet to file a Debian bug, as I will need some time on a system where the slowdown is noticeable and I’m using a current Debian version. But I wanted to post now to give props to bernat for his help. If you think you have this issue, go read his article linked above, which contains the workaround.