Retiring as a Debian developer

This is a repost and update of my retirement letter sent privately to Debian last month, July 10, 2016. At that time I received many notes of appreciation and good wishes which I treasure. Now, I’d like to say goodbye to the broader Debian community and, as well, indicate which of the cleanup items have since been addressed in strikethrough style and with annotations. Also, I’d like to stay in touch with many of you, so I have added some comments oriented towards those of you who are interested in doing that after the letter.

When in 1995, on a tip from a friend, I installed Debian on my 386 at work and was enthralled with the results, I could not have foreseen that two years later, friends I had made on channel #debian would nudge me to become a Debian developer. Nor when that happened did I have any idea that twenty years later, I’d consider Debian to be like family, the greatest free software community in the world, and would still be promoting it and helping people with it whenever I could. Debian quietly, unexpectedly became a part of what defines me.

My priorities in life have changed over that time, though. I have shifted my attention to things that are more important to me in life, such as my family, my health and well-being physically and spiritually, and bringing all I can to bear on the task of preserving our local wilderness areas and trails. In the latter area, I’m now bringing all of what Debian has helped shaped me to be to the table, launching some ambitious projects I hope will bear fruit in the coming years, and make a measurable contribution to help us hang onto our precious natural preserves where I live.

Unfortunately, as I’ve poured more time and energy into these things, I’ve increasingly not been giving my packages the care they need. Nor do I have any roles or goals now for any of the Debian projects I was previously involved in. So, after much careful deliberation, and as much as it pains me to say it, it’s time to retire as a Debian developer. It has been a great privilege to work with you, and to meet many of you in New York at Debconf 10. I plan to be around online, and will continue to take an interest in Debian, lending a hand when I can. Thanks for all of the fun times, for all that I’ve learned, and for the privilege to make awesome things with you. I’ll treasure this forever.

So much for the soppy bits. 🙂 Now, business. These things remain to clean up upon my departure, and I’d appreciate help from QA, and anyone else who can lend a hand. My packages are effectively orphaned, but I haven’t the time to do any of the cleanup myself, so please speak up if you can help.

  1. Debian Jr.
    • O: junior-doc. The junior-doc package has been awaiting an overhaul by whoever revives the project since I gave it up years ago. I’m still listed as maintainer and that should be changed to Debian Junior Maintainers <debianjr-maintainers@lists.alioth.debian.org> if they want it. Otherwise, it is orphaned.
    • I should also be dropped from Uploaders from debian-junior, the metapackages source. Fixed in git.
  2. Tux Paint. This is a very special package that deserves to go to someone who will love it and care for it well. There are three source packages in all:
    • O: tuxpaint
    • O: tuxpaint-config
    • O: tuxpaint-stamps
  3. O: xletters. This is a cute little typing practice game and needs a new maintainer.
  4. XPilot is co-maintained by Phil Brooke <pjb@debian.org>, so he should replace me as Maintainer. Phil said he’ll pick up xpilot-ng and will also look at xpilot-extra.
    • xpilot-ng
    • O: xpilot-extra (recently removed from testing due to my neglect, and not co-maintained by Phil; it’s unclear if anyone really uses this anymore)
  5. GTypist is co-maintained by Daniel Leidert <dleidert@debian.org> and should replace me as Maintainer.
  6. My ruby packages. A group of packages that I brought into Debian as dependencies of taskwarrior-web, which I never completed. Maybe they’ll be useful in and of themselves, and maybe not. In any case, they are maintained by pkg-ruby-extras-maintainers, but I’m the sole developer in Uploaders and should be removed: Fixed in git.
    • ruby-blockenspiel
    • ruby-parseconfig
    • ruby-rack-flash3
    • ruby-simple-navigation
    • ruby-sinatra-simple-navigation
    • ruby-term-ansicolor
    • ruby-versionomy
  7. Debian Live stuff: I am listed in Uploaders for live-manual (fixed in git) and debian-installer-launcher (fixed in git) and need to be removed.
  8. O: eeepc-acpi-scripts. The defunct Debian EeePC project has just this one package. Recently, the mailing list was asked about its status, and it was recently NMU’d. To my knowledge, nobody from the original team remains to take care of it, so it needs a new maintainer. I should be removed from Uploaders, and since the Debian Eee PC Team no longer exists, it should be removed as maintainer. It is effectively orphaned unless someone speaks up.

There are also some Alioth projects / lists that are defunct that I’ll need to talk to the Alioth admins about cleaning up in the coming days. One of these is <debian-eeepc-devel@lists.alioth.debian.org> and since it is still listed as the maintainer of eeepc-acpi-scripts, that needs to be sorted out before the list can be closed.

Thanks again, and see you around!
Ben

Stay in touch

For those of you who would like to stay in touch, here are some ways to do that:

  • Follow my blog: http://syn.theti.ca
    If you already do that, great! If not, welcome to my blog! For the past couple of years you may have noticed a decrease in technical content and increase in local trails and conservation oriented posts. You can expect more of the latter.
  • Say hi to me on irc: SynrG (also SynrGy) on irc.oftc.net (irc.debian.org) or irc.freenode.net.
    I still intend to hang out and offer support when I can, just no longer as a developer. Channel #debian-offtopic on either network is a good place to catch up with me socially.
  • Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SynrG
    For better or worse, a lot of the trails and conservation folks hang out here, and many of you in the Debian community are already my Facebook friends.
  • Look for my Bluff Trail posts on their site: https://wrweo.ca
    Providing tech support to this organization is where much of my time and energy is going these days. I post here once in a while, but do most of my work behind the scenes as a volunteer and, newly this year, as a board member.
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Debian Live After Debian Live

Get involved

After this happened, my next step was to get re-involved in Debian Live to help it carry on after the loss of Daniel. Here’s a quick update on some team progress, notes that could help people building Stretch images right now, and what to expect next.

Team progress

  • Iain uploaded live-config, incorporating an important fix, #bc8914bc, that prevented images from booting.
  • I want to get live-images ready for an upload, including #8f234605 to fix wrong config/bootloaders that prevented images from building.

Test build notes

  • As always, build Stretch images with latest live-build from Sid (i.e. 5.x).
  • Build Stretch images, not Sid, as there’s less of a chance of dependency issues spoiling the build, and that’s the default anyway.
  • To make build iterations faster, make sure the config is modified to not build source & not include installer (edit auto/config before ‘lb config’) and use an apt caching proxy.
  • Don’t forget to inject fixed packages (e.g. live-config) into each config. Use apt pinning as per live-manual, or drop the debs into config/packages.chroot.

Test boot notes

  • Use kvm, giving it enough ram (-m 1024 works for me).
  • For gnome-desktop and kde-desktop, use -vga qxl, or else the desktop will crash and restart repeatedly.
  • When using qxl, edit boot params to add qxl.modeset=1 (workaround for #779515, which will be fixed in kernel >= 4.3).
  • My gnome image test was spoiled by #802929. The mouse doesn’t work (pointer moves, but no buttons work). Waiting on a new kernel to fix this. This is a test environment related bug only, i.e. should work fine on hardware. (Test pending.)
  • The Stretch standard, lxde-desktop, cinnamon-desktop, xfce-desktop, and gnome-desktop images all built and booted fine (except for the gnome issue noted above).
  • The Stretch kde-desktop and mate-desktop images are next on my list to test, along with Jessie images.
  • I’ve only tested on the standard and lxde-desktop images that if the installer is included, booting from the Install boot menu option starts the installer (i.e. didn’t do an actual install).

Coming soon

See the TODO in the wiki. We’re knocking these off steadily. It will be faster with more people helping (hint, hint).

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The passing of Debian Live

Debian Live has passed on. And it has done so in not happy circumstances. (You can search the list archives for more if you are confused.) I have reposted here my response to this one thread because it’s all I really want to say, after all of the years of working with the team.

I’d like to add as a postscript, that while the focus of this article was to remain positive in the face of Daniel’s announcement of the closure of his project, that event has left a lot of users confused about the status of live support in Debian going forward. Read my posts here and here addressing that confusion.

On 09/11/15 12:47 PM, Daniel Baumann wrote:
> So long, and thanks for all the fish[7].
>
> Daniel
>
> [7] http://live.debian.net/project/downstream/

Enough bitter words have been said. I don’t want to add any more. So:

I’m proud.

Indeed, that long list of downstreams does speak to the impact you’ve had in inspiring and equipping people to make their own live images. I’m proud to have been a small part of this project.

I’m thankful.

I’m thankful that I was able to, through this project, contribute to something for a while that had a positive impact on many people, and made Debian more awesome.

I remember the good times.

I remember fondly the good times we had in the project’s heyday. I certainly found your enthusiasm and vision for the project, Daniel, personally inspiring. It motivated me to contribute. Debconf10 was a highlight among those experiences, but also I had many good times and made many friendships online, too.

I’m sad.

I’m sad, because although I made some attempts to liaise between Debian Live and the CD and Installer teams, I don’t feel I did an effective job there, and that contributed to the situation we now find ourselves in. If I did you or the project injury in trying to fulfill that role, please forgive me.

I’m hopeful.

I’m hopeful that whichever way we all go from here, that the bitterness will not be forever. That we’ll heal. That we’ll have learned. That we’ll move on to accomplish new things, bigger and better things.

Thank you, Daniel. Thank you, Debian Live team.

Ben

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Learning Nova Scotia Plants with Anki Flashcards

plants_of_nova_scotiaOne of the greatest pleasures of walking and hiking is to appreciate all of the many living things encountered along the way. A big part of that appreciation for me is to be able to identify individual species and learn the relationships among them. To that end, I would like to introduce a flashcard deck I created, based on the glossary of the excellent, and also free, Nova Scotia Plants, by Marian C. Munro, Ruth E. Newell, and Nicholas M. Hill, so that I could more effectively use the book as an amateur student of our local flora.

  • Download the book.
  • Download my Nova Scotia Plants glossary flashcard deck for Anki.
  • Install Anki for your platform and register at ankiweb.net.
  • Import the apkg deck file in Anki.
  • Enjoy studying the plants of Nova Scotia with these resources.
  • Comments are welcome here, and a review on ankiweb.net would be appreciated.

Creating the Nova Scotia Plants glossary for Anki

I authored the deck on Debian, using the free software utility pdftotext (from poppler-utils), the small shell script below to produce a rough draft, and a text editor to clean up any errors, inconsistencies, and artefacts caused by the conversion process, such as descriptions which wrapped to a second line.

#!/bin/sh
pdftotext -f 40 -l 55 \
  'Print Nova Scotia Plants complete manuscript.pdf' \
  glossary_raw.txt
egrep -v '^[ixvl]+$' glossary_raw.txt | \
  grep -P '^\f?[ a-z]+' | \
  sed -re 's/^\f?([^–]+)( [-–]+ ?|[-–]+ )( ?(.+))/\1\t\4/' \
  > glossary_import.txt

Nova Scotia Plants

The Anki flashcard deck is intended as a companion for studying Nova Scotia Plants, linked above, and available either as a single PDF file, or multiple, smaller PDFs per section or family. This ebook has been a constant companion to me on my tablet during my walks and to study in quiet moments of the day. It has enriched my enjoyment of nature in Nova Scotia immeasurably. I am indebted to the authors for the years of work they put into it, and for making it available to the public for free. I hope you get as much out of it as I have.

Anki for devices

One of the criteria I used in selecting Anki as my flashcard software is that it is available for Debian, but also should work on my devices. I use the free software, AnkiDroid, on my Android phone and tablet, available both in F-Droid and the Google Play store. I understand there is also AnkiMobile for iOS, but that is not free.

Feedback

Please take the time to give me feedback. I spent an afternoon and a morning putting these materials together to share, and am eager to hear if my work has benefited you. Let me know if you have any suggestions for improvements, and don’t forget to leave a review at ankiweb.net.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Debian Live Rescue needs some love

You may have noticed that Jessie no longer includes the useful rescue flavour of live image, formerly included in Wheezy and earlier releases, and neither will Stretch unless you take action. This is my second public call for help this year to revive it. So if you care about rescue, here’s how you can help:

  • First, try a self-built image, based on the old live-image-rescue configuration. While Jessie still contains the live-image-rescue configuration for live-build as a starting point, to successfully build this image for yourself, you need to edit the package lists to drop or substitute any packages that aren’t in the archive. As of writing, this includes libphash0, mii-diag, denyhosts, hal and emacs23-nox. (Tip: for the latter, substitute emacs24-nox.)
  • Join or form a team to maintain the rescue metapackages in the long term. All of the official Debian Live images are based on metapackages that are looked after by various other teams, (principally the desktop teams,) with rescue being the sole exception. The old package lists include some forensics packages, so you may wish to contact Debian Forensics, but I don’t want to presume they’ll take it on.
  • Have your team decide on what a rescue system should include. You might start with the old lists, spruced up a bit just to make the image build, or you might take an entirely different tack. This is your project, so it’s up to you.
  • File a bug on tasksel, preferably with patch, to include a task-forensics and/or task-rescue task (or whatever you decide the task or tasks should be called).
  • File a bug on the live-images package to include your work.

If you have any questions not answered in this post, please feel free to leave a comment on this blog, talk to the Debian Live team on irc — I’m SynrG, and hang out with the team at #debian-live @ irc.oftc.net) — or drop us an email at debian-live@lists.debian.org.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Invisible CSS animations on Iceweasel consuming CPU

Thanks to bernat on #debian @ irc.debian.org for helping me track down this bug and devise a workaround.

When working on my wife’s netbook, I noticed that when idling on Facebook in iceweasel 24.3.0esr-1, the process was taking far too much CPU. I then retested on a wheezy system with the release iceweasel from mozilla.d.n, which at that time was 26, and I later upgraded to 27. Same problem there, too, on both versions. In fact, it seems the slowdown was amplified by the fact that I was running iceweasel in vnc4server, not the worlds most efficient X implementation.

Even with all these versions tested, I have yet to file a Debian bug, as I will need some time on a system where the slowdown is noticeable and I’m using a current Debian version. But I wanted to post now to give props to bernat for his help. If you think you have this issue, go read his article linked above, which contains the workaround.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Taskwarrior new blog, getting involved

The Taskwarrior Team has just started a blog, kicking it off with a series of articles about development of Taskwarrior itself. Go, team!

Almost from the moment I started using Taskwarrior (thanks to Jakub WIlk for an excellent job maintaining this) I knew I had finally found the todo system that I could love. Right away, I started hanging out with the Taskwarrior community at #taskwarrior @ irc.freenode.net and found out what an awesome bunch of people they are, both developers and users alike. I have plunged in with bug reports and feature requests, and am helping get more Taskwarrior-related things into Debian. In NEW right now I have uploaded several of the dependencies needed by my ITP of taskwarrior-web. It’s looking like I’ll have that finished later this month or early next month. Also, I have uploaded a wheezy backport of Taskwarrior itself (aka ‘task’) which, if all goes well, enters the archive next week.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Tutorial: wheezy live iso-hybrid with persistence on USB

As of wheezy, Debian no longer offers for download any prebuilt hdd (formerly known as usb-hdd) live images, which, in squeeze, were necessary if you wanted to use persistence. The good news is, since the new wheezy iso-hybrid images use xorisso, you can copy an image to a USB key and repartition it to add a persistence partition. Unfortunately, the filesystem itself is read-only, so you have to manually append the persistence boot parameter each time you boot the image. If that doesn’t bother you, you can skip this whole tutorial and just follow the instructions in live-manual for adding a persistence partition and you’re all set.

This tutorial explains how to extract the contents of a wheezy iso-hybrid live image to a USB key and modify it to boot with this parameter permanently enabled. I am writing it solely as a workaround and do not endorse this as a means to customize Debian Live images in general. I would love to help make a more convenient, supported way to accomplish the same thing for a future release. Meanwhile, the supported and recommended way to make any change to a Debian Live image is to build it from scratch using live-build, as described in live-manual. A simplified Debian Live Images Autobuilder web service is available that works well for many common customizations, if you prefer. Please use one of these methods if you want to do this, or other customizations in the supported way. Otherwise, read on.

Prerequisites

  • You need to download a Debian iso-hybrid live image. For this tutorial, I will use the Debian live wheezy amd64 LXDE image:
  • Note the size of the image. With ls -lh debian-live-7.0.0-amd64-lxde-desktop.iso you can see the image size for this example is 854M. Later, you will use this size plus 5% for the size of the partition to receive its contents.
  • You need a USB key large enough for both the image itself and your persistence partition. For this image, you could even use a 1G key, although that would leave very little space for persistence. In this tutorial, the test key is 8G, leaving lots of room on the key for growth.
  • I assume for this example you are preparing the key on a Debian or other Linux system that automounts media when they are plugged in, a fairly normal configuration.
  • This tutorial also uses the following tools, which you will need to install if you don’t have them already:
    • parted
    • mbr
    • dosfstools
    • p7zip
    • syslinux

Identify the USB key device

Caution: Always double-check the device you are writing to is the correct one to avoid losing precious data. There are two things to do to protect yourself. The first is, don’t write the USB key as root. The second is, first use ls -l /dev/disk/by-id to identify which device is the target USB key.

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  9 Jun 22 11:58 
usb-SanDisk_Cruzer_Contour_0000184CA87406BC-0:0 -> ../../sdb

As you can see, my SanDisk Cruzer Countour is /dev/sdb. For the rest of the tutorial, I’ll be referring to this device as /dev/sdX to avoid unfortunate cut-and-paste disasters. When you follow along, make sure you substitute the correct device for your USB key on your system.

Initialize the USB key

Start by plugging in the key and unmounting any automounted partitions to ensure nothing is accessing the device, e.g.

$ umount /dev/sdX1

Now make changes to the partition table. Use parted because it may be run as an ordinary user and has some advanced capabilities beyond more basic tools like fdisk.

$ /sbin/parted
WARNING: You are not superuser.  Watch out for permissions.
GNU Parted 2.3
Using /dev/sdX
Welcome to GNU Parted! Type 'help' to view a list of commands.
(parted) print devices
/dev/sdX (8221MB)
(parted) select                                                           
New device?  [/dev/sdX]?                                                  
Using /dev/sdX
(parted)

Note that when run as an ordinary user, if you only have one removable drive (which may include mp3 players, cameras, e-readers) plugged in, parted immediately selects that device. But just to be sure, use print devices to list the devices and select to if you need to select a different one, as shown above.

Repartition the USB key

Once you’ve verified you have the correct device, start repartitioning. Write a new partition table with mklabel msdos to wipe out all of the old partitions on it. You may skip this step and adapt the remaining instructions if there are partitions you need to keep. This is your last chance to bail if the device is wrong, so make sure it is the correct one before proceeding.

(parted) mklabel msdos
Warning: The existing disk label on /dev/sdX will be destroyed and all data
on this disk will be lost. Do you want to continue?
Yes/No? y
Error: Partition(s) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 on
/dev/sdX have been written, but we have been unable to inform the kernel of
the change, probably because it/they are in use.  As a result, the old
partition(s) will remain in use.  You should reboot now before making further
changes.
Ignore/Cancel? i
(parted)

The error is normal, and appears when you run parted as an ordinary user, so it is OK each time it appears to press “i” to ignore it. For the rest of this tutorial I will omit these errors from the output for brevity.

Make three partitions, a fat32 partition for the image itself that is 5% larger than the size of the ISO, a 1G ext4 partition for persistence, and an extra fat32 partition for the rest of the space. Put the extra partition first so that other OSes you might use the key with will be able to use it. Use relative positioning from the end of the device to make it easy to put all of the rest of the space in the first partition. Finally, flag the live image partition bootable.

(parted) mkpart primary fat32 1 -1897M
(parted) mkpart primary ext4 -1897M -897M
(parted) mkpart primary fat32 -897M -0
(parted) set 3 boot on
(parted) quit
Information: You may need to update /etc/fstab.

Unplug the USB key and plug it in again so that the kernel will re-read the updated partition table. If there were old filesystems on the key that were automounted, unmount them again. Now we’re ready to make the new filesystems.

$ umount /dev/sdX1
$ /sbin/mkdosfs -nEXTRA /dev/sdX1
mkdosfs 3.0.16 (01 Mar 2013)
$ /sbin/mkfs.ext4 -q -Lpersistence /dev/sdX2
$ /sbin/mkdosfs -nLXDE /dev/sdX3
mkdosfs 3.0.16 (01 Mar 2013)

Make the USB key bootable

Use install-mbr to install an MBR on the key and syslinux to install the bootloader to boot into your live image partition.

$ /sbin/install-mbr /dev/sdX
$ syslinux -i /dev/sdX3

Mount the partitions

Unplug the key and plug it in again so the new partitions will be automounted.

Observe where the partitions are mounted with df.

$ df
...
/dev/sdX1        6204568         4   6204564   1% /media/EXTRA
/dev/sdX3         831888         4    831884   1% /media/LXDE
/dev/sdX2         944120      1204    894124   1% /media/persistence

Extract the ISO contents to the key

To continue preparing this key as an unprivileged user, use p7zip to extract the ISO. You may alternatively mount the ISO loopback and extract it that way, but you must be root to do that.

$ cd /media/LXDE
$ 7z x ~/debian-live-7.0.0-amd64-lxde-desktop.iso
...
Extracting  live/filesystem.packages-remove
...

When live/filesystem.squashfs is extracted (right after live/filesystem.packages-remove) it will take the longest time of all of the files to extract, as it contains the whole live filesystem. Be patient and eventually it and all other files on the image will finish extracting.

...
Everything is Ok

Folders: 245
Files: 370
Size:       892183367
Compressed: 895483904

Modify the bootloader configuration files

The syslinux bootloader configuration directory and files within it are named isolinux when installed on an ISO. You need to rename the directory and two files changing isolinux to syslinux so the bootloader will find them on your fat32 live image partition.

$ mv isolinux syslinux
$ mv syslinux/isolinux.cfg syslinux/syslinux.cfg
$ mv syslinux/isolinux.bin syslinux/syslinux.bin

Enable full persistence

Next, append “ persistence” to the live boot parameters and turn on full persistence by putting “/ union” in a persistence.conf file in the persistence partition.

$ sed -i 's/\(append boot=.*\)$/\1 persistence/' syslinux/live.cfg
$ cd /media/persistence
$ echo / union > persistence.conf

Reboot into the live system

Now your USB key is ready to boot with full persistence enabled. Have fun!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Debugging the installer on Debian Live

I’ve been using this process for debugging the installer while launched from a Debian Live desktop. Having a full live environment at your disposal during install is a boon to debugging because you don’t have to work within the constraints normally imposed upon you by the limited debian-installer environment. Caveat: running debian-installer from the debian-installer-launcher still has one or two unresolved issues, so unless you’re specifically working on live integration issues like I am, compare with a conventional d-i image install to gain the added confidence the install is the same in both environments.

There are no longer active maintainers working on debian-installer-launcher and live-installer, and I think it’s really important for wheezy to release with solid support for live installs, so I’ve been using this setup to try to solve #702335. So far, progress is slow because I’m new to this. If anyone is interested in collaborating in this work, give me a shout. I am SynrG @ irc.oftc.net and can be found on #debian-live and #debian-boot if you would like to drop in.

Overview:

  1. Use images/lxde-desktop config from live-images.git and build your own image with live-build >=3.0.1-1. Just add “-b hdd” in auto/config before starting your build, as having a read/writable image is handy for this exercise.
  2. Boot the live medium. You may prefer to do this in a VM for convenience, having prepared a blank virtual disk image as your target in advance.
  3. Make any small changes you want to the installer before launching it.  A quick hack I’ve used is to “sudo vi /usr/sbin/debian-installer-launcher” and near the end on the line after “prepare” right before “run”, open a new line and add “bash” so an interactive shell will be opened after the installer is extracted but before it is launched. For larger changes (e.g. inclusion of updated udebs, etc.) add them to your live image configuration before building as described in live-manual.
  4. Open two root terminals and do “debian-installer-launcher -t debug” in one and “tail -f /lib/live/installer/var/log/syslog” in the other. If you’ve added the hack from step 3, don’t forget to “exit” the interactive shell after making changes. Now you can watch debug output as you go through the steps of the installer. If you like, you may append additional boot prompt parameters (e.g. preseeds) to the debian-installer-launcher command.
  5. During the install, you may modify other parts of the unpacked installer under /lib/live/installer (e.g. to add ‘set -x’ to some scripts) prior to executing steps that would call them.
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail