Debian Live After Debian Live

Get involved

After this happened, my next step was to get re-involved in Debian Live to help it carry on after the loss of Daniel. Here’s a quick update on some team progress, notes that could help people building Stretch images right now, and what to expect next.

Team progress

  • Iain uploaded live-config, incorporating an important fix, #bc8914bc, that prevented images from booting.
  • I want to get live-images ready for an upload, including #8f234605 to fix wrong config/bootloaders that prevented images from building.

Test build notes

  • As always, build Stretch images with latest live-build from Sid (i.e. 5.x).
  • Build Stretch images, not Sid, as there’s less of a chance of dependency issues spoiling the build, and that’s the default anyway.
  • To make build iterations faster, make sure the config is modified to not build source & not include installer (edit auto/config before ‘lb config’) and use an apt caching proxy.
  • Don’t forget to inject fixed packages (e.g. live-config) into each config. Use apt pinning as per live-manual, or drop the debs into config/packages.chroot.

Test boot notes

  • Use kvm, giving it enough ram (-m 1024 works for me).
  • For gnome-desktop and kde-desktop, use -vga qxl, or else the desktop will crash and restart repeatedly.
  • When using qxl, edit boot params to add qxl.modeset=1 (workaround for #779515, which will be fixed in kernel >= 4.3).
  • My gnome image test was spoiled by #802929. The mouse doesn’t work (pointer moves, but no buttons work). Waiting on a new kernel to fix this. This is a test environment related bug only, i.e. should work fine on hardware. (Test pending.)
  • The Stretch standard, lxde-desktop, cinnamon-desktop, xfce-desktop, and gnome-desktop images all built and booted fine (except for the gnome issue noted above).
  • The Stretch kde-desktop and mate-desktop images are next on my list to test, along with Jessie images.
  • I’ve only tested on the standard and lxde-desktop images that if the installer is included, booting from the Install boot menu option starts the installer (i.e. didn’t do an actual install).

Coming soon

See the TODO in the wiki. We’re knocking these off steadily. It will be faster with more people helping (hint, hint).


The passing of Debian Live

Debian Live has passed on. And it has done so in not happy circumstances. (You can search the list archives for more if you are confused.) I have reposted here my response to this one thread because it’s all I really want to say, after all of the years of working with the team.

I’d like to add as a postscript, that while the focus of this article was to remain positive in the face of Daniel’s announcement of the closure of his project, that event has left a lot of users confused about the status of live support in Debian going forward. Read my posts here and here addressing that confusion.

On 09/11/15 12:47 PM, Daniel Baumann wrote:
> So long, and thanks for all the fish[7].
> Daniel
> [7]

Enough bitter words have been said. I don’t want to add any more. So:

I’m proud.

Indeed, that long list of downstreams does speak to the impact you’ve had in inspiring and equipping people to make their own live images. I’m proud to have been a small part of this project.

I’m thankful.

I’m thankful that I was able to, through this project, contribute to something for a while that had a positive impact on many people, and made Debian more awesome.

I remember the good times.

I remember fondly the good times we had in the project’s heyday. I certainly found your enthusiasm and vision for the project, Daniel, personally inspiring. It motivated me to contribute. Debconf10 was a highlight among those experiences, but also I had many good times and made many friendships online, too.

I’m sad.

I’m sad, because although I made some attempts to liaise between Debian Live and the CD and Installer teams, I don’t feel I did an effective job there, and that contributed to the situation we now find ourselves in. If I did you or the project injury in trying to fulfill that role, please forgive me.

I’m hopeful.

I’m hopeful that whichever way we all go from here, that the bitterness will not be forever. That we’ll heal. That we’ll have learned. That we’ll move on to accomplish new things, bigger and better things.

Thank you, Daniel. Thank you, Debian Live team.



Learning Nova Scotia Plants with Anki Flashcards

plants_of_nova_scotiaOne of the greatest pleasures of walking and hiking is to appreciate all of the many living things encountered along the way. A big part of that appreciation for me is to be able to identify individual species and learn the relationships among them. To that end, I would like to introduce a flashcard deck I created, based on the glossary of the excellent, and also free, Nova Scotia Plants, by Marian C. Munro, Ruth E. Newell, and Nicholas M. Hill, so that I could more effectively use the book as an amateur student of our local flora.

  • Download the book.
  • Download my Nova Scotia Plants glossary flashcard deck for Anki.
  • Install Anki for your platform and register at
  • Import the apkg deck file in Anki.
  • Enjoy studying the plants of Nova Scotia with these resources.
  • Comments are welcome here, and a review on would be appreciated.

Creating the Nova Scotia Plants glossary for Anki

I authored the deck on Debian, using the free software utility pdftotext (from poppler-utils), the small shell script below to produce a rough draft, and a text editor to clean up any errors, inconsistencies, and artefacts caused by the conversion process, such as descriptions which wrapped to a second line.

pdftotext -f 40 -l 55 \
  'Print Nova Scotia Plants complete manuscript.pdf' \
egrep -v '^[ixvl]+$' glossary_raw.txt | \
  grep -P '^\f?[ a-z]+' | \
  sed -re 's/^\f?([^–]+)( [-–]+ ?|[-–]+ )( ?(.+))/\1\t\4/' \
  > glossary_import.txt

Nova Scotia Plants

The Anki flashcard deck is intended as a companion for studying Nova Scotia Plants, linked above, and available either as a single PDF file, or multiple, smaller PDFs per section or family. This ebook has been a constant companion to me on my tablet during my walks and to study in quiet moments of the day. It has enriched my enjoyment of nature in Nova Scotia immeasurably. I am indebted to the authors for the years of work they put into it, and for making it available to the public for free. I hope you get as much out of it as I have.

Anki for devices

One of the criteria I used in selecting Anki as my flashcard software is that it is available for Debian, but also should work on my devices. I use the free software, AnkiDroid, on my Android phone and tablet, available both in F-Droid and the Google Play store. I understand there is also AnkiMobile for iOS, but that is not free.


Please take the time to give me feedback. I spent an afternoon and a morning putting these materials together to share, and am eager to hear if my work has benefited you. Let me know if you have any suggestions for improvements, and don’t forget to leave a review at


Colours of Autumn 2015, Bluff Trail

My friend Ross Mayhew and I enjoyed a perfect Autumn afternoon yesterday, full of colours on the Bluff Trail. Not all of these photos do justice to the splendour and intricate detail I had hoped to capture, but I hope you enjoy them all the same. Click the photo to start the slideshow.

Late afternoon at the top of Pot Lake loop
Late afternoon at the top of Pot Lake loop
On my way to hike, the Canada holly hints of things to come Canada holly berries bright red and close to the branch (vs. dusky red false holly berries on long stems) Unsure which fern this is. Ross says Christmas, but the leaf margins aren’t serrated, but smooth. Sheltered by this mossy stump, a pretty mushroom Moss found climbing up a rotted stump, peculiar in that it has flat, fern-like fronds Ross and I spent a while examining this peculiar flat-fronded moss The reds of the huckleberries and maples were striking A tiny fern by a trickle of water across the path A familiar view overlooking Cranberry Lake, now in its fall splendour Brilliant Canada holly berries along the bog at our hike’s end

Cranberry Lake and nearby bog – Fall, 2015

On one of my regular walks with a friend, we decided today to walk part of the BLT Trail to Cranberry Lake and the bog just past it, an easy 5 km round trip.

On the trail to the lake, golds dominate
On the trail to the lake, golds dominate
A calm day, the lake like glass
A calm day, the lake like glass
In the bog, copper and golden hues
In the bog, copper and golden hues
On the margins of the bog, brilliant orange and red
On the margins of the bog, brilliant orange and red
The reds, dark greens and dead trees in counterpoint
The reds, dark greens and dead trees in counterpoint
At our turning point, my cranberry patch provided a puckery snack
At our turning point, my cranberry patch provided a puckery snack

Halifax Mainland Common: Early Fall, 2015

A friend and I regularly meet to chat over coffee and then usually finish up by walking the maintained trail in the Halifax Mainland Common Park, but today we decided to take a brief excursion onto the unmaintained trails criss-crossing the park. The last gasp of a faint summer and early signs of fall are evident everywhere.

Some mushrooms are dried and cracked in a mosaic pattern:



Ferns and other brush are browning amongst the various greens of late summer:


A few late blueberries still cling to isolated bushes here and there:


The riot of fall colours in this small clearing, dotted with cotton-grass, burst into view as we round a corner, set behind by a backdrop of nearby buildings:



The ferns here are vivid, like a slow burning fire that will take the rest of fall to burn out:


We appreciate one last splash of colour before we head back under the cover of woods to rejoin the maintained trail:


So many times we’ve travelled our usual route “on automatic”. I’m happy today we left the more travelled trail to share in these glimpses of the changing of seasons in a wilderness preserved for our enjoyment immediately at hand to a densely populated part of the city.


Annual Bluff Hike, 2015

Here is a photo journal of our hike on the Bluff Wilderness Trail with my friend, Ryan Neily, as is our tradition at this time of year. Rather than hike all four loops, as we achieved last year, we chose to cover only the Pot Lake and Indian Hill loops. Like our meandering pace, our conversations were enjoyable and far ranging, with Nature doing her part, stimulating our minds and bodies and refreshing our spirits.

A break at the summit of Pot Lake loop. Click to start slideshow.
A break at the summit of Pot Lake loop. Click to start slideshow.
Northern bayberry A few showers quickly dissipated into light mist on the first leg of the hike Ryan, enjoying one of the many beautiful views Cormorant or shag. Hard to say from this poor, zoomed cellphone shot. Darkened pool amongst the rugged trees Late summer colours A riot of life shoots up in every crevice Large boulders and trees, forming a non-concrete alley along the trail margin Huckleberries still plentiful on the Indian Hill loop Sustenance to keep us going Not at all picked over, like the Pot Lake loop We break here for lunch Just about ready to embark on the last half We are surprised by the productivity of these short, scrubby huckleberries Barely rising from the reindeer moss, each huckleberry twig provides sweet, juicy handfuls A small pond on the trip back A break on the home stretch “Common” juniper, which nevertheless is not so common out here Immature green common juniper “berries” (actually cones)

Hike at Blomidon Park: Late Summer, 2015

I had the wonderful privilege to go camping and hiking with my kids’ scouting group, the Pathfinders of Tantallon SDA church. The day started with a quick trip to Pugwash with one of the leaders to bring back some chairs to their school, and then we headed back out to Blomidon to meet up with the group. Click the photo below to start the slideshow.

The road trip started early to fetch some chairs
The road trip started early to fetch some chairs – click to start
The smudgy truck windows make an interesting filter Still an hour or more away from our first stop More funky filtering, this time with trees participating Wentworth valley – taken over the cluttered dash We disturbed a great blue heron’s breakfast at Wallace The beach at Pugwash SDA Camp where we loaded the chairs Trucking along past Truro After dropping off chairs, finally approaching Blomidon Getting very close to Blomidon Some bikers out to enjoy the views Interesting white berries Interesting red berries My first up close look at the point with my hiking buddy, Dave, on the first day An experimental panorama. Not sure I have the knack for keeping the horizon straight. We must bring the group out here tomorrow! Fast ringneck snake! Hard to get a clear shot Pre-dawn over the campground The first blush of coming dawn The Moon and Venus just before dawn Evergreens surrounding our camp site, pre-dawn Seems I’m still the only one up Half of the tents on the spacious group site Half of the tents on the spacious group site My daughter, the artist My two youngest and their best friend Some relaxing down time after breakfast Not sure who said what, but apparently they were hilarious. :) The smoke was a bit much for my eldest Geoff entertaining the troops Dave making breakfast Dave making breakfast Breakfast just wrapping up Relaxing while we finish breakfast Looks like that needs some tweaking A bit too smoky The whole group The whole group Just goofing around Who’s winning? Enjoying the last embers of the breakfast fire before heading to Jodrey Trail I admire this young lady’s great eye for photography She has some sweet gear A lot of old hardwoods out here Dave did this hike with me yesterday – Excellent hiking buddy! Words can’t describe how much more stunning these views are in person All the cameras came out Got to get that perfect shot! A tree clinging to the eroding ground above the sheer cliff A lookoff on Jodrey Trail A lookoff on Jodrey Trail Lining up her shot /a> A lookoff on Jodrey Trail A lookoff on Jodrey Trail A lookoff on Jodrey Trail A fern with sharply serrated sturdy leaves I’m not familiar with Breaking camp at group site 404 One final chance to enjoy the view from the park entrance before heading home

McIntosh Run “Hike the Greenbelt” event, August 2015

Just came back from a wonderful time hiking with my daughter at the finale Hike the Greenbelt event at the Backlands/McIntosh Run! This photo slideshow is from my HP snapshot camera which unfortunately has dust in the lens. But I felt it was more important to get them up soon than to get them perfect, so please click the photo below to start the slideshow. I want to thank everyone who made this event a success, and not going to name specific names as I’m sure I’ll miss someone important. But thanks especially to Martin, the leader of our group.

Marcos Zentilli explaining geology of the region. Click photo to start slideshow.
Marcos Zentilli explaining geology of the region. Click photo to start slideshow.

BLT Bike Trail – Early Summer 2015

This is one of my regular walking routes, from home to Five Island Lake and back. It’s about 15 km. I usually walk too briskly to capture the many visual delights of this route. Today on the trip out, I stopped and took several photos to share with you.

An early morning walk up the BLT bike trail. Click to start the slideshow.
An early morning walk up the BLT bike trail to Five Island Lake (pictured here) and back. Click to start the slideshow.
The walk starts from our subdivision. It’s cool and clear when I leave.

Saskatoon berries Saskatoon berries Saskatoon berries Dew on leaves Dew on leaves Pitcher plants Something’s attacking this alder. Maybe woolly aphids?

Wild strawberries Wild strawberry Wild strawberry Wild strawberry Wild strawberries Daisy Daisy Vetch Vetch Water lily Water lily

Sensitive fern Squirrel! Cranberry Lake Cranberry Lake